All posts by Keelin Billue

Chicago-based writer by way of Alabama, New Orleans, and Nashville. Writes primarily about music, sports (sort of), and the topics that piss people off at work and family holidays.

“Illegitimi non carborundum” Vibes with The Budos Band

Illegitimi non carborundum is a mock-Latin aphorism, often translated as ‘Don’t let the bastards grind you down’. The phrase itself has no meaning in Latin and can only be mock-translated as a Latin–English pun.

Today, I feel disappointed and tired on so many levels today. The Budos Band strikes me as the proper fellas to see it through.

Isolated with “Delete Forever” by Grimes

Here is a comprehensive list of things I know about Grimes:

  1. Elon Musk
  2. Elon Musks’s baby
  3. She’s way beautiful and strange.
  4. This is the one song I know, and I like it:

This song is about the opioid epidemic. However, as it was released around when the Covids were gettin’ hot hot hot, I think this song will become or already is the theme of isolation.

For me, this song plays in the background when I think about all of the unfinished things waiting to be picked back up when there is a return to a new normal. These pages beg me to finish them, but I would rather shut that book and walk away as I used to be able to easily do.

The Old’s Old Records #1: Gustav Holst’s The Planets, PiL’s Greatest Hits So Far, Hound Dog Taylor’s Beware Of The Dog, Pink Floyd’s The Wall & Final Cut

My friend William at A1000MISTAKES is also digging out his records with a funny story about an angry ex. Great picks and trippy picks inside:

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OK, something different for this Thursday morning! So the old’s are my mother and father, off course and I do have what is left of their old record collection plus seems we are all staying at home right now, it might be a good time listen to all these?

I’m borrowing/stealing this cool idea from a blog/blogger: Bitchfork subtitled still not as bitchy as Pitchfork, which is funny/true! Bitchfork is linked here and her name is Keelin Billue who’s writing/blogging from Chicago. It’s called Vinyl Days so I’ve re-named my inspired post but here’s the last Vinyl Days post linked here or the tag linked here, please do check out Bitchfork blog because she’s got great taste in music and total wicked blogger!

A little background to begin: all these are begin pulled out of a big purple painted wooden box in the corner of my living room, straight…

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Saint Cloud by Waxahatchee

Today, I had a wonderful exchange with my friend TK:

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TK and I have been friends for 12 years. Our friendship is very much marked by the aughts.  Having first been introduced on MySpace, we met for the first time in person in New Orleans when he was visiting with his wonderful friends and bought my 2008 Bonnaroo ticket. We’ve stayed in touch ever since with ebbs and flows mostly because I ebb in most of my relationships (still working on this, friends).

Suffice to say, he is wonderful friend and knows me well. Thus his recommendations are some I hold in highest regard. When he texted me about the latest Waxahatchee album, Saint Cloud, I immediately turned it on.

I love this album and captures all the feelings and cultural trappings I feel so personally to boot.

 

Vinyl Day 8: Spyro Gyra “Morning Dance”, Beach Boys and more “Shut Down”, & Barbara Streisand “Guilty”

Hello! I needed to take a break from the internet for a few days. Welcome to day 8 of an investigation of my vinyl. Catch up on the other days here.


Artist: Spyro Gyra
Album: Morning Dance
Year: 1979
Genre: Jazz, jazz fusion
Record Origins: Mum and Dad

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Haha oh my god. I thought I knew who Spyro Gyra was, and I was expecting a more Jethro Tull sound. That expectation was extremely wrong. I don’t want to spend too much time on this as it reminds me of songs form a 70s porno or perhaps a beach love montage. I understand why jazz fusion gets such a bad rap at times.

NEXT.


Artist: Beach Boys, Robert Mitchum, The Cheers, and The Super Stocks
Album: Shut Down
Year: 1963
Genre: Hot rod rock (yes, this is a thing).
Record Origins: One of the parents. I don’t think they acquired this together.

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I get the feeling this is a special album. I cannot find a lot of information about it besides on some auction sites, and I read it is scarce. I am not really interested in selling these. So, I don’t care how much it is (and it may be nothing). It is a very fun album. The Beach Boys are an enigma to me. The Wilson brothers (er, at least Brian and Dennis) were drinking their lives away while writing these superficially chipper sounds. Honestly, there is nothing so sad or relatable to me at times as artists who are making pieces that are so opposite of what they are feeling inside.

Infamously and sadly, Dennis died in 1983 while homeless, nomadic, and hammered. He drowned after blacking out in shallow water trying to retrieve some of his ex-wife’s items, which he had thrown off of his yacht 3 years earlier.

Here are the Beach Boys performing “Shut Down”, the title track from the album I have, in happier times.


Artist: Barbara Streisand
Album: Guilty
Year: 1980
Genre: Pop
Record Origins: Mum and Dad

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This is a hell of an album cover: Barry Gibb, of the Bee Gees and producer of this album, hugging Barbara Streisand. Glorious manes of hair all around.

The top single of this Guilty is “Woman in Love”, and it was written by 2/3 of the Bee Gees, Barry and Robin. And you can hear the Bee Gees EVERYWHERE on this album. So even thought the album is Babs, it is very fitting that Barry Gibb is on the cover of the album, holding Babs, and probably whispering “Yes…you and the is album are my little baby.”

Here is the powerful single “Woman in Love”. I didn’t want to like it, but I really to like it.

“Whistle & Fish” by John Prine: Choosing Lightness in Time of Crisis

29 March 2020 EDITOR’S NOTE: Just heard today that John Prine is in critical condition with COVID-19, and I don’t even know what to say.


It seems that things, while still absurd, have gotten a bit too heavy lately. And, it is good to step away from the heaviness, no matter how serious it is.

Even legends like John Prine stepped away from heavier songs about social commentary to record songs like “Whistle & Fish”, a song that’s most simple message is about gratitude and not taking anything too seriously.

Fish and whistle, whistle and fish,
Eat everything that they put on your dish,
When we get through we’ll make a big wish,
That we never have to do this again, again? again?

When we’re used to going so fast, how do we lighten up?

During these times, I’ve appreciated the funny or simple things I notice on my runs more because, well, I ain’t got nothin’ but time. I’ve enjoyed “hanging out” with my South Side Hit Pen mates a lot. There are more home-cooked meals. More reading. More music. Less ruminating. It is a cliche, but it has made me want a different kind of life and have the time flesh out what kind of life that might be.

While the world seems like it might be coming apart, it is a quiet time and there is much to behold, and I am in awe of how quickly things that societal paragons and powerhouses crumble without us all to keep it afloat. The phrase “tiny but mighty” is more true now than ever. I am reveling in my smallness and appreciating the small delights.

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hope

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We cannot control much right now, and it is important to maintain a lightness of being and sense of humor in this time like our dear friend John Prine. Stay well, friends.

Guest Post: “Music or Misery” with Tommy Barbee

Today, we’re trying something new because what better time to experiment in the middle of a societal breakdown?

Tommy Barbee is my former professional colleague, current colleague over on South Side Hit Pen, a daily source of creative inspiration, an excellent partner in conversation (ranging from modern philosophical and moral issues to extremely low brow humor), and, most importantly, we can get into fights and recover. I would certainly refer to him as one of my besties. Is the feeling mutual? Who’s to say? 🙂

Recently, he shared some musings of his own about this strange time and how it relates to a question originally posed by High Fidelitya book turn movie in 2000 (and seminal Chicago film) now turned show on Hulu. Enjoy.


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“What came first, the music or the misery?” – High Fidelity

As I sit here observing the now commonly accepted social distancing in affect as we attempt to offset the latest wave of impending doom that 2020 has thrown society’s way, I find myself coming back to this question. It’s a simple question, but an indelible idea that has stuck with me since my formidable teenage years. Sure, like every other angsty teenage boy that is now on the older fringe of Millennials, I spent more time than I’d care to admit listening to the likes of Weezer, Radiohead, and Coldplay mixed in with the more socially accepted hip-hop music of the time.

Was I anxious and depressed because I listened to OK Computer and later Kid A one too many times? Sometimes it felt that way, and I still refuse to listen to a Radiohead album from beginning to end so as not to spark a sudden bout of existential crisis.

As an adult that has distanced himself from the awkwardness of adolescence, I find myself feeling as isolated as ever in this time of unwavering panic. Once again, I’m turning to music to make sense of things.

It’s true, too much Elliott Smith can bring you down. Even so, he conjures such depth of emotion that somehow your life, or a generational experience, can be summed up in mere minutes. Right now, finding something– anything– that can help reflect or make sense of the emotions felt today is exactly the kind of “misery” needed.

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Feel free to connect with Tommy on Twitter: @kindableu.